Labelling Agroecology: A Study of Valuation Processes in Developing Countries.

Allison, Marie Loconto (2020)

In: Laurent, Brice/Mallard, Alexandre (eds.), Labelling the Economy. Qualities and Values in Contemporary Markets. Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 59-90.

EXTRACT

“In this sense, value is the result of a process of assessing and producing worth for the parties of the exchange (Vatin 2013), rather than a fixed attribute of a good or service that is exchanged (Muniesa 2011, 2014). Value is negotiated and is always a compromise between quality and worth (Fourcade 2011). Put differently, value is an achievement, the result of interactions within a socio-technical agencement (Callon et al. 2013) that enables it to be stabilized and have meaning for actors (Loconto 2015). Valuation processes are dynamic activities where a value is attached to a given item that turns it from an object without any declared value into a product that can be traded at an agreed-upon price or other equivalent means of exchange. Much like the process of attachment and detachment processes of singularization (Callon et al. 2002), this approach essentially ‘bring[s] order to mere differences’ or ‘classifies’ agroecology (Kjellberg et al. 2013). Conventions theory argues that a market exchange is only possible when there is some agreement about the ‘quality’ of the products to be traded and devices for quality assessment (Boltanski and Thévenot 2006 [1991]).” (p. 62)

Link

Contested Terrain: The Ongoing Struggles over Food Labels, Standards and Standards for Labels

Busch, Lawrence (2020)

In: Laurent, Brice/Mallard, Alexandre (eds.), Labelling the Economy. Qualities and Values in Contemporary Markets. Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 33-58.

EXTRACT

“Importantly, only some of these actors are directly concerned with markets. More often, each appeals to different ‘worlds’ to support their actions. As Boltanski and Thévenot (2006 [1991]) and Walzer (1983) have shown, no single world can encompass all the accepted notions of justice that we humans employ. Instead, we find that clashes occur among these different worlds.” (p. 45)

Link